Amazon Support Store

Hi everyone! I keep getting lots of emails from people asking where they can buy xyz to complete the tutorials and try out some of the things listed on CaptainGeek, well after I kept emailing people the same links i had a thought, why not setup an amazon affiliate store. Basically, i’ve setup a small amazon site with a small selection of products (only those used for the tutorials on this site + related ones), purchases and payments are handled by amazon, however a small percentage of the sale goes to helping fund the server this website is hosted on AT NO EXTRA COST TO YOU 🙂 so its a win win situation, please use the links whenever you can.

Our Amazon Store

 

How To Easily Setup A Basic IPV6 Tunnel (TSP)

Setting up IPV6 connectivity may at first seem daunting and complicated, and yes… it is, but i’m gonna make it really easy for you, i’m not going to assume you understand IPV6 and i’m not going to try and teach you, thats for you to research yourself, however in this guide im going to document the easiest way to setup IPV6 connectivity, whether you’re behind a NAT / router or directly connected to the Internet. In future tutorials I will go into more detail including router / subnet configuration, the 6in4 method and much more!

  • Setting up an IPV6 Tunnel behind a NAT / Router (using TSP)
  1. Sign-Up to a tunnel broker that supports TSP here is a list however i recommend go6.net
  2. Download the latest tsp/gateway6 client utility from here (windows) or here (linux / bsd)
  3. Install the Gateway6 client, or build it if your on linux / bsd (i won’t document this here as its pretty straight-forward)
  4. Now choose one of the following depending on what system you use:
  • Linux
    • Open gw6c.conf in an editor of your choice (nano/vim/ee)
    • You only have to edit a few options in the config for standard host configuration look for these lines and fill them in appropriately.
      • username=lameusername
        password=lamepassword

        server=whatever.they.gave.you.com (e.g. amsterdam.freenet6.net)

        #auth_method=anonymous
        auth_method=any

        host_type=host

        log_file=3

        template=linux

    • Once you have edited the lines above save the config file and exit your editor
    • Now run the gw6c binary with the -f switch to identify your config file, e.g.
      • ./gw6c -f gw6c.conf
    • Once this is done if you run ifconfig you should see a new interface has been setup and given an IPV6 address with a subnet of /128 (this is host)
    • If any errors occur check your gw6c.log in the same directory as the binary for any logging information, also here it should show your IPV6 address
      • ping6 michaelarmstrong.eu
    • If the site responds then you have successfully enabled IPV6 on your system!

    NOTE: There is much more configuration possible if required but it is beyond the scope of this how to.

  • Windows
    • Run and Install the gateway6 client package (Next, Next…)
    • Load the Gateway6 Client from your Start Menu
    • Fill in your username, password, server using the details provided by your broker, e.g. mike123, lamepass, amsterdam.freenet6.net
    • Click Connect!
    • Open Firefox and visit http://ipv6.michaelarmstrong.eu!

Setting up basic IPV6 connectivity is as simple as that with TSP, in future tutorials I will write how-to’s on how to setup a router configuration, the 6in4 method which has less overheads but doesn’t support NAT traversal, and OpenWRT Configuration! Enjoy!

 

Forwarding IPV6 From an OpenWRT Based Router

Do you have an OpenWRT based router (sveasoft / dd-wrt / jassager all use OpenWRT), instead of setting up your ipv6 tunnel on the router itself, you can forward protocol 41 (which is ipv6) to an end point within your network (say another machine), this is what configuration i currently use and find it much easier to cope with. The router itself doesn’t have to support ipv6, just have iptables installed and working 🙂 in this example 192.168.1.101 is my endpoint where i wish to setup the actual tunnel, and ppp0 is the WAN interface on the router.

the ip table inbound destination NAT for IPv6 tunnel

# iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i ppp0 -p 41 -j DNAT --to 192.168.1.101

the ip table inbound forwarding for IPv6 tunnel

# iptables -t filter -A FORWARD -i ppp0 -p 41 -d 192.168.1.101 -j ACCEPT

Now you can go ahead and setup your ipv6 tunnel using any methods which don’t support NAT traversal!