iPhone 6 and 6 Plus side by side Paper Comparison

So on September 9th (as of time of writing thats last night) Apple announced (among other things) the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus… Both are which are larger than the any predecessor. I won’t go into details of what each phone does / has… as i’m sure you can find that information anywhere on the Internet :). The biggest question on everyones minds is….

Which should I buy?

So, I was curious about the sizing of the new devices, therefor I made a really quick and dirty paper prototype with the precise dimensions. What it shows… the 6 Plus is a beast, larger, but somewhat smaller than a Samsung Galaxy Note II, but probably a commuters powerhouse, a halfway house between the traditional sized iPhone and iPad. Whereas the iPhone 6 is a welcomed and comfortable size increase on the iPhone 5/5S/5C generation.

Samsung devices in the Apple Spaces

Now next to the original devices

IMG_1330 iPhone sizing

 

Despite the iPhone 6 Plus being ginormous… I think thats the one i’ll be getting… Having to commute 1 hour a day on a train and being an overall geek… it suits me well ­čÖé

For more info on the specs and sizing of the new iPhones I suggest visiting the apple specs webpage.

 

Mockacino a lightweight ruby/sinatra API Mocking script

Hi Guys, so i’ve been working on a new app recently for a client of mine, currently there is no API… so in the meantime I decided to knock up a quick few lines of ruby to get a mocking api up and running… to explain this better, I need not do more than paste my README.md here.. Enjoy ­čÖé

Mockacino

A very simple and easy to use MOCK API server that serves static JSON written in ruby/sinatra.


NOTE:┬áThis is a super simple, super fragile MOCKING SERVER Intended so you can test routes and mock an API with static jso whilst you’re still building the real production API.┬áDO NOT EVER use this in production…┬áSeriously. It breaks a lot and will if you try… DONT. Absolutely 0 effort went into it, therefor 0 Warranty. Use if you dare.

DOCS:

Folder structure defines API calls…. return.json is what gets served.

site_root ->;
    [ http method ] ->; [ api call route ] ->; [ json response contents of call return.json ] 

e.g.

site_root ->;
    GET ->; users ->; return.json
    POST ->; users ->; create ->; return.json

If you have static assets you wanna reference in the json, plonk them in the ASSETS folder

e.g.

site_root ->; file.jpg

You can call http://yourhost:port/ASSETS/file.jpg

Here’s the directory structure of the sample project included here

mockacino.rb  
./site_root/ASSETS
./site_root/GET
./site_root/POST
./site_root/GET/sheep
./site_root/GET/sheep/create
./site_root/GET/sheep/return.json
./site_root/GET/sheep/create/return.json

Which supports calls like…

http://localhost:4567/sheep
http://localhost:4567/sheep/create

And gives responses from the static result.json file like…

{
    "sheep": [
        {
            "id": "1234",
            "name": "Dolly Two",
            "url": "http://mike.kz/sheep1234",
            "assets": {
                "small_image": "http://cloned.sheep.com/ASSETS/small.jpg",
                "large_image": "http://cloned.sheep.com/ASSETS/large.jpg"
            }
        }
    ]
}

Usage:

gem install sinatra
ruby mockacino.rb
 

Swift the new Language for writing Cocoa and Cocoa Touch Apps

swift programming language

Introducing Swift

I’ve been at WWDC 2014 all week and one of the major announcements from Apple was a new programming language they’ve been working on named “Swift”, immediately it flashed me back to a really old WWDC where they announced an experimental language they were playing with named “Dylan” but I could be wrong.

Swift attempts to┬ádeliver a fast modernised language that looks and behaves as an interpreted language such as Ruby or Python but has all the power of a compiled language such as C++/Objective-C.┬áFrom what i’ve seen on the interweb and twitter, there seems to have been a mixed reception from developers, but overall its looking more positive than not… My stance is… i’m gonna read more than 60 pages and wait more than 48 hours before declaring either my love or hate for Swift :)… If you’ve seen the blogosphere lately, you’ll understand what I mean.

Apple have released a publicly available (so i’m guessing not under NDA) Swift book on the iBook Store thats lengthy, doesn’t assume you’re an 8 year old and gives a decent overview of the Swift programming language, in what seems is from a “answer all of your questions and thoughts” approach, with some examples and exercises along the way.

I’ve attended the Swift labs almost everyday this week armed with questions, thoughts, suggestions and generally the engineers have been great at responding to everything. As a result i’ve filed radars, been convinced i’m not crazy and had some insight into the future of the language.

My main bone of contentions so far are:

  • No sensible/pretty way to selectively expose method A vs method B.
  • The threading model is still a little undefined and incomplete.
  • Autocomplete and LLDB seem to still be a very much work in progress.
  • Downcasting syntax is overly verbose.
  • Did I do it wrong? or did Xcode just shit itself?

However┬áhaving said that, Swift was released early to us the developers, in order to get feedback/suggestions and help Apple build it to how we want… lets not forget, i’ve had (at the time of writing) 96 hours experience in Swift and its only been public for around the same amount of time… so a lot is likely to change.

What I like so far:

  • Generally a nicer more modern syntax
  • Less “falling back” to C for common things
  • Less unnecessary verbosity *(most the time)
  • Pretty seamless “bridging”/”interoperability” (or whatever the term should be) to existing Objective-C code
  • Namespacing, Modules & Frameworks
  • Explicit typing support with some intelligence from the compiler too
  • An emphasis on “tell the compiler as much as possible”

As soon as I figure out whether or not we’re allowed to talk about more, i’ll go into more detail on some of these points and post some sample code. I’m currently working on an iOS Framework written in pure swift that I’m sure people will enjoy, i’ll be posting it on GitHub in the near future here it is now, but its probably far away from prime time and perhaps a little useless ­čÖé but a great way to learn Swift!

As always, thoughts and criticisms should be constructive and not defamatory and furthermore, have your own opinion, no one you follow on twitter is an expert on this yet ­čÖé so don’t be afraid to voice your opinions and join in the healthy discussion.

If you wanna chat about it more, i’m @ArmstrongAtWork on twitter.

 

 

 

Objective-C iOS Code Style Guidelines (Part #1)

I move around on different projects a lot and work with different developers every few months. One thing I’ve noticed is people picking up bad habits from blogs and Stack Overflow posts that get very popular despite their quality (this is not a blanket statement of course)… On the other hand however, I’m able to share experiences with other developers and pickup some good tips in the process. One bone picking point is always what convention to use, when, where and most importantly… Why!

Something i’ve been asked for a few times recently and something I continually tweak as my own preferences and style changes is my Objective-C iOS Code Style Guideline doc. I thought i’d share it here for everyone to use, love and consume. All I ask is that you don’t steal it as your own and that you perform any discussion on twitter using #mike.kz or message me @italoarmstrong ­čÖé

These guidelines of course are my own personal preferences, which have developed over many years and will continue to change, even as writing this point, I changed my mind on a few points in the below guide. So take inspiration from it, rather than thinking “this is correct way of doing it” as its not. Thats usually the point in a “guideline”.

…