Compiling Swift from Source on the Raspberry PI

In late 2015, Swift was fully open sourced by Apple and hosted by GitHub. (you can find more info about both of these items on the Swift.org website and Apple’s Github.)

What this did was open up a lot of interesting opportunities and potential for a lot of people / projects / systems. I’m sure the first thing on a lot of people’s minds was… “will it run on X?”. Well the answer is… sure why not… Apple already provide ready-made packages for a few Linux variants and there are also ready-made packages out there for other platforms too, including android :o. There’s no fun in using a ready-made packages though right? if you’re insane enough, why not try to compile Swift on the Raspberry PI? Well thats what I did and here’s what I found out…

If you want to get a decent installation of Swift up and running, including the compiler, Foundation, stblib then the whole thing consists of 9 different git repo’s.

Initially I tried a Raspberry PI Zero ($5 Tiny Computer) running the latest Raspbian. Unfortunately, after trying a few times (with each cycle taking around 12 hours), I didn’t get very far at all. First I had to make some modifications to some of the repo compile time checks, then manually install newer versions of cmake / clang etc, try different compilation configurations etc… after which the PI Zero sadly didn’t have enough memory to get to the very end. So for the remainder of this post i’ll be using a Raspberry PI2 running the latest Ubuntu Mate image.

From here-on in, i’m gonna summarise a little, as getting this far took me a few days of hacking combined with trial and error, of which i’ll spare you the details.

 

Ubuntu Mate¬†This is the OS you’re gonna need to load onto your microSD before continuing. You could try with Raspbian, but i’ve had mixed results. NOTE: this only works on armv7 based PI… so as of writing thats the Raspberry PI2.

A full clone of all repo’s you’ll need for Swift, as you’ll see below, a couple of the repo’s are not the official Apple ones, this is because they’ve had patches applied to them to aid in compilation on the Raspberry PI

UPDATE: 2017, You can now check-out all the repo’s directly from Apple and it will successfully compile as PI support has been merged in.

sudo apt-get install git -y
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift.git swift
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-llvm.git llvm
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-clang.git clang
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-lldb.git lldb
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-cmark.git cmark
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-llbuild.git llbuild
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-package-manager.git swiftpm
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-corelibs-xctest.git
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-corelibs-foundation.git

In case you still want to use the old repo’s, they’re here for reference.

sudo apt-get install git -y
git clone https://github.com/hpux735/swift.git swift
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-llvm.git llvm
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-clang.git clang
git clone https://github.com/hpux735/swift-lldb.git lldb
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-cmark.git cmark
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-llbuild.git llbuild
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-package-manager.git swiftpm
git clone https://github.com/apple/swift-corelibs-xctest.git
git clone https://github.com/hpux735/swift-corelibs-foundation.git

Make sure to clone all of the above into the same parent folder, so you should end up with 9 different folders.

There are a few dependencies you will need to get the compilation going, along with a few others added in for your benefit, as you’ll need them immediately after.

sudo apt-get install build-essential cmake ninja-build clang python uuid-dev libicu48 libicu-dev icu-devtools libbsd-dev libedit-dev libxml2-dev libsqlite3-dev swig libpython-dev libncurses5-dev pkg-config

Now comes the more nitty gritty part. You’re gonna need three resources for this compile. CPU, RAM and Disk Space. You can’t do a lot about CPU, however you can improve the RAM and Disk Space situation quite easily.

Assuming you haven’t already expanded your root filesystem to the extents of your microSD card, we’ll do this now using the easiest approach possible. There’s a neat little utility called raspi-config that is an aid to some of the common tasks you’ll need to do on your pi.

sudo apt-get install rasps-config -y

Now run it and choose “Expand Filesystem”, after you’ll see an option to change the Memory (RAM) Split between GPU and System, you’ll want to allocate as much as possible to the System for now, it’ll make the GUI a little sluggish but don’t worry about that for now… After you’ve changed the value reboot and thats it!

After all this, we still have a lack of RAM… likely around 1012MB (1024-12vmem) available. The compile of Swift will take a lot of memory to get things going, so we’re gonna enable a SWAP file. This essentially will allocate a portion of your microSD card for on-demand “RAM” that can be used when your actual RAM has ran out. Its very similar to how paging works on other platforms, but at the same time, completely different. The caveat is… SWAP on a microSD is very very slow, however you’ll have to make do.

sudo apt-get install dphys-swapfile

This will enable a file to be used for SWAP, usually on Linux you slice off a specific partition for this purpose, but as its only going to be temporary whilst we compile Swift, we’ll use our approach.

Now that all the above is complete, we’re ready to get on with compiling ūüôā We’re going to build a “release” configuration of Swift with no-assertions enabled, what this will do is greatly speed up the compile time (by around a factor of 2) whilst reducing the memory usage required. The trade-off is that you won’t have debug symbols or a great ability to poke around. For our needs, it’ll suffice.

From the parent folder you cloned the 9 repositories into, perform the following steps:

cd swift
utils/build-script -R --no-assertions

Now go and make a tea, watch a box-set of game of thrones and come back around 9 hours later… You’ll either find yourself with an Error, or a lovely compiled version of Swift on your Raspberry PI! If the latter is the case, lets take it for a spin!

~# nano helloworld.swift
  let message = "Hello World!"
  print(message)

hit (Ctrl+X)
hit (Y)

~# swiftc helloworld.swift

~# ./helloworld

Hello World!

Viola!

P.S I’m currently refining this post to add a script that performs all of the above.

Questions or comments, hit me up on Twitter @ArmstrongAtWork

 

Mocking data for UI testing in Xcode 7

Over the passage of time working on different projects i’ve seen a lot of different automation frameworks to handle UI testing. Mostly quite similar, they rely on the concept of having deterministic mock data that will power your views, they then drive your views through a user journey to assert an expected outcome. Most of these frameworks follow the Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) approach to writing tests through their adoption of Cucumber, I won’t go into the details of these here as its not really relevant.

Xcode UI testing however takes a different stance and on my current project, we’ve used it more as a “no, don’t unit test that, its a view controller, write a UI test” style tool, rather than a fully fledged automation framework. What this really means is, we’re asserting things like “the menu only contains 5 items that match our mocked data” or “when you hit login an activity indicator view is displayed”; whereas in UI Automation land we’d be testing things like “given i’m a logged out user, then I enter text into username and text into password, then I hit login, I should be presented the welcome screen”… Or similar. So effectively we’re testing small discreet units of UI within our application.

The two things we soon discovered we’d need for this are:

 The ability to inject dependencies where possible so we can load views without always necessarily progressing through a user journey to them.

The ability to test our views deterministically. This means we require MOCK data.

Why don’t we just go to the network, we can guarantee our API? Well, basically because you can’t. If you can run your test suite in a nuclear bunker, surrounded by a faraday cage with no outward or inward connectivity, then you’re onto a winner. The ability to be deterministic, to be certain that if your test fails its not because of some outward problem, but indeed due to a problem with your implementation, is vital for this specific type of testing. Other testing strategies such as end-to-end etc can accomodate this.

I’ve seen a few approaches to mocking data over the past decade. The common theme seems to be either one of:

Running a proxy that will returned canned responses to requests, configuring your network to use it as appropriate..

Littering all of your network code with #ifdef UI_AUTOMATION… and returning canned responses from an NSBundle.

In each individual test case, creating stubs and mocked responses for HTTP calls on the fly

All work, but it can be a little easier depending on your use case. SuperMock is inspired by both… a framework that you can drop into an existing code base, provide it with a simple .plist that maps network calls to canned responses in your NSBundle, functions as an NSURLConnection/NSURLSession proxy, but runs as part of your application test target, runs no server, requires no network and only leverages built in components of Foundation.

Example Scenario:

You have a menu in your application, which is dynamically driven from a web service, the contents of this menu can change at any time, but you’d like to assert that given some data, it populates and draws correctly on the screen.

Given the aforementioned problems… bring on the MOCK!

Example of the required Mocks.plist

Example of the required Mocks.json

By defining your original/real URL in

Mocks.plist

of SuperMock and running 1 line (ok maybe 2) of code in your AppDelegate, you are able to guarantee the value of your menu items in your application. Making your UI Test case very simple to write and very reliable to run.

How to implement SuperMock in your App.

How to implement SuperMock in your App.

Now when your HTTP client fires off a request for

http://mike.kz/api/menu.json

it will instead get returned

file://....menu_MOCK.json

from the NSBundle you provided earlier. In your UI Tests (whatever framework you use), you can now assert based upon these MOCK values. Whats advantageous is that there is no more work to be done and no extra code in your test cases to stub out responses.
This is a short whirlwind tour of my latest little pet project, but expect to see feature like dynamic override of mocks (for use when you want the same URL to return different responses upon each request) and some more real world scenarios.

I’ll be using this framework a lot myself in my personal projects over the coming months, so I may tweak / change / improve / try not to break it, in the process. Right now its functional but not complete and needs a new README.md ?

 

https://github.com/michaelarmstrong/SuperMock / @ArmstrongAtWork

 

MacBook 2015 released with 12″ Retina Display. My Thoughts & Comparison

design_retina_large

On 9th March 2015, Apple announced (among other things…) an all new MacBook, I won’t go into the marketing details as you’ll find those everywhere else. Essentially however its an ultra low power, ultra light, 12″ MacBook with a Retina Display. As a heavy 11″ MacBook Air user I can confidently say I think they’ve really pulled it out the bag this time.

Firstly looking at the overall dimensions of the 12″ MacBook I was very surprised to see its smaller than the 11″ Air (just about) in every dimension, whilst¬†also being lighter and having a 1″ bigger display.

Device Height Width Depth Weight
2014 MacBook Air 11″ 0.11-0.68″ (0.3-1.7 cm) 11.8″ (30 cm) 7.56″ (19.2 cm) 2.38 lb (1.08 kg)
2015 MacBook 12″ Retina 0.14-0.52″ (0.35-1.31 cm) 11.04″ (28.05 cm) 7.74″ (19.65 cm) 2.03 lb (0.92 kg)

To summarise, the thinnest part of the MacBook is thicker than the thinnest part of an Air by 0.05 cm (which perhaps is a good thing if you’ve seen how thin and almost transparent the MacBook Air 11″ display is) and its slightly deeper, apart from that its almost identical in its dimensions, which is great if (like me) you’ve invested in bags/sleeves and the likes, all your non-technical accessories will still work.

Additionally its battery life estimates and tech specs are very comparable if not identical to the battery in the 11″ MacBook Air. Meaning you get your retina display without any compromise… Except one…

The next part of this post is purely speculation until proper benchmarks arrive, however, after some digging into the Intel Core M, i’ve noticed only 5 Broadwell architecture CPU’s exist and one in particular matches the top spec CPU mentioned by Tim Cook in the Apple Keynote almost identically. I’ll take a look at that top spec CPU vs the top spec CPU of the 11″ MacBook Air.

Device CPU Power Cores Benchmark
2014¬†MacBook Air 11″ Intel Core i7-4650U 15W Max TDP 2 (4 logical) 4156*
2015 MacBook 12″ Retina Intel Core M-5Y71 4.5W Max TDP 2 (4 logical) 2780*

* according to cpubenchmark.net

What this shows is the 2014 MacBook Air 11″ in its top spec config scores 66% higher than the 2015 MacBook 12″ Retina. However what it shows me is that trade off has been made in choosing an ultra low powered CPU to maintain battery life whilst giving the user a Retina Display. Remembering, the benchmark used isn’t a real world scenario, its more of a point scoring benchmark and additionally, I have no idea what CPU the new MacBook 12″ Retina actually uses… This is just an intelligent guess. Interestingly again, both CPU’s support up to 16GB Memory, however the configs at Apple top out at 8GB.

Nevertheless¬†if price wasn’t a factor, it’d be really tough to choose an MacBook Air 11″ over a MacBook 12″ Retina. Having a black bezel, retina display, edge to edge keyboard really sells it here for me. I was happy with the existing size of the MacBook Air 11″, but every little helps. Mondays keynote was the first time I truly agreed with and believed Jonny Ive when he said something along the lines of¬†“we’ve really tried to optimise the efficiency of the MacBook’s design as much as possible”.

 

The next thing that sparked by interest was the inclusion of USB-C for… everything, (for those who don’t know, its a new USB standard that allows power, data + different standards over a single cable). I travel a lot and although my Air rarely runs out of a battery when i’m out of reach of a power outlet, its interesting to think that you could buy a 29$ USB-C to USB cable and potentially charge your MacBook 12″ Retina using the same portable battery pack you use to charge your iPhone / iPad, it is to be confirmed, but i guess it wouldn’t be reaching far to expect this. UPDATE: I can confirm you can charge your MacBook 12″ with a portable battery pack you use for your iPad/iPhone. ūüôā

Power pack charging MacBook

 

[follow_me]
Those are my initial thoughts beyond the keynote and various tech blog info out there and i’ll try to update this post once my Space Grey top spec MacBook 12″ with Retina Display has arrived and i’ve (with sentiment) retired my trustworthy and fantastic MacBook Air 11″.

 

SuperRecord an ActiveRecord implementation in Swift

All the media buzz around swift seems to be having some tangible effect. I won’t go into the opinionated slaw of Swift VS Objective-C VS Swift VS XYZ here :). Many of you know I freelance in the iOS space around London and beyond for SuperArmstrong and one of my recent clients asked me to work on a greenfield project to replace a very old wrapped web app they had. When we got down to the nitty gritties, one of their few requirements was that it should be written in Swift. My jaw did drop a little… considering this was about 20 days after Swift had first been publicly announced. After some conversation, we came to the mutual conclusion that they were brave.

Like many of the apps I work on, this project relied heavily on CoreData, as a convenience I decided i’d try out a library that I have a lot of respect for (even though its had its challenging moments) “MagicalRecord”, having only done organic¬†CoreData for the past few years. As you probably know, Objective-C and Swift can sit alongside in a project and work in unison… however, not all the interoperability¬†is 100% sound. I soon started to endure strange bugs and thanks to the incompleteness of Swift lldb support at the time (especially when mixing with Objective-C) these bugs soon became quite difficult to track down.

The most annoying was this:

let entityDescription = NSEntityDescription.entityForName("Pokemon", inManagedObjectContext: context)

Although harmless… this would actually fail when trying to insert an entity of that description into your managed object context. The culprit here? the NSString to String bridging (or vice versa).

To get around this bug (which I won’t go into too much detail) I began using:

let entityName = "Pokemon" as NSString
let entityDescription = NSEntityDescription.entityForName(entityName, inManagedObjectContext: context)

Performing a forced downcast to NSString. So great, now it works… However, many of the MagicalRecord finders and helpers I was using, would not have these forced downcasts as they came from the Objective-C world. I first forked MagicalRecord, after delving into the source-code, making many changes for better Swift support, fixing some threading irregularities I then realised I was putting a lot of work into making something work that had more functionality than I required at the time. So I embarked on making a Swift ActiveRecord style “companion” to CoreData.

The reason I say “companion” and not “wrapper” is that I didn’t want to abstract away CoreData too much or remove the power from the hands of the developer. I wanted to make the developer’s life easier, whilst maintaining their flexibility.

I’d much rather do something like this:

let pokemon = Pokemon.createNewEntity() as Pokemon

and avoid the above lines + more.

Thereby SuperRecord was born. The original goals for SuperRecord were simple.

  1. Give me the ActiveRecord style finders I crave, optimise them, keep my application level code tidy, but still performant.
  2. Rather than me typing out the same code in each project to handle batch updates on my UITableView and UICollectionView classes, have a special “one size fits all” class that will act as your NSFetchedResultsControllerDelegate, providing “safe” batch updated to your reusable views.
  3. Additionally, I didn’t wanna have to spend too much time creating NSFetchedResultsControllers all the time either, so I added some helpers for this too.
  4. Be written in Swift, keeping the public API’s simple and stable, but changing the implementation as Swift changed and moved with updates.

In late October 2014 whilst still very much a work in progress, I released the first public version and it was featured in the great iOS Dev Weekly newsletter. I decided to release it early as I saw a lot of discussion around CoreData and Swift and thought there’d be a lot of people interested in this OSS effort, so we could build up a good toolset as a community. I’m still the only maintainer… (not by choice) but its early days :).

Below is some extract from the README.md but I suggest you head over to the project on github for more information and feel free to checkout the demo project also on github which shows how to use the safe batched updates along with some other common tasks.

 

Core Files

  • NSManagedObjectExtension.swift¬†This extension is responsible for most of the “finder” functionality and has operations such as¬†deleteAll(),¬†findOrCreateWithAttribute()createEntity()¬†and allows you to specify your own¬†NSManagedObjectContext¬†or use the default one (running on the main thread).
  • NSFetchedResultsControllerExtension.swift¬†In constant development, this Extension allows the easy creation of¬†FetchedResultsControllers¬†for use with¬†UICollectionView¬†and¬†UITableView¬†that utilise the¬†SuperFetchedResultsControllerDelegate¬†for safe batch updates.
  • SuperFetchedResultsControllerDelegate.swift¬†heavily inspired by past-projects i’ve worked on along with other popular open source projects. This handles¬†safe batch updatesto¬†UICollectionView¬†and¬†UITableView¬†across iOS 7 and iOS 8. It can be used on its own with your¬†NSFetchedResultsController¬†or alternatively, its automatically used by the¬†NSFetchedResultsControllerExtension¬†methods included in¬†SuperRecord.
  • SuperCoreDataStack.swift¬†a boilerplate experimental main thread CoreData stack. Can be used either as a sqlite store or in memory store. Simply by calling¬†SuperCoreDataStack.defaultStack()¬†for SQLite or¬†SuperCoreDataStack.inMemoryStack()¬†for an in memory store. Of course you have access to your context¬†.context¬†/¬†.saveContext()

Usage

Create a new Entity

Assuming you have an NSManagedObject of type “Pokemon” you could do the following

let pokemon = Pokemon.createNewEntity() as Pokemon

Please add @objc(className) above the class name of all your NSManagedObject subclasses (as shown in the demo project) for now. Better support will be coming in the future.

Creating an NSFetchedResultsController

This feature is currently in progress with basic support so far, in future versions, sorting and sectionNameKeyPath’s will be supported. Until then you can create your own NSFetchedResultsController, however, if you have no need for the above missing functionality then simply use

lazy var fetchedResultsController: NSFetchedResultsController = self.superFetchedResultsController()

func superFetchedResultsController() -> NSFetchedResultsController {
return NSFetchedResultsController.superFetchedResultsController("Pokemon", tableView: tableView)
}

With Pokemon being the entity name of your NSManagedObject.

Delete Entities

I’m planning on adding much more powerful functionality around Delete soon, such as deleteAllWithPredicate() or deleteEntity(), right now all that is available is

Pokemon.deleteAll()

Method Listing

This isn’t an exhaustive list of all methods and classes, however it includes some of the most useful ones.

  • NSManagedObjectExtension
  • findAllWithPredicate(predicate: NSPredicate!, context: NSManagedObjectContext) -> NSArray
  • findAllWithPredicate(predicate: NSPredicate!) -> NSArray
  • deleteAll(context: NSManagedObjectContext) -> Void
  • deleteAll() -> Void
  • findAll(context: NSManagedObjectContext) -> NSArray
  • findAll() -> NSArray
  • findFirstOrCreateWithPredicate(predicate: NSPredicate!) -> NSManagedObject
  • findFirstOrCreateWithPredicate(predicate: NSPredicate!, context: NSManagedObjectContext) -> NSManagedObject
  • createNewEntity() -> NSManagedObject
  • findFirstOrCreateWithAttribute(attribute: NSString!, value: NSString!, context: NSManagedObjectContext) -> NSManagedObject
  • findFirstOrCreateWithAttribute(attribute: NSString!, value: NSString!) -> NSManagedObject
  • NSFetchedResultsControllerExtension
  • superFetchedResultsController(entityName: NSString!, collectionView: UICollectionView) -> NSFetchedResultsController
  • superFetchedResultsController(entityName: NSString!, tableView: UITableView) -> NSFetchedResultsController

NSFetchedResultsControllers created using this method will automatically handle safe batch updates.

Developer Notes

This whole project is a work in progress, a learning exercise and has been released “early” so that it can be built and collaborated on with feedback from the community. I’m using it in a project I work on everyday, so hopefully it’ll improve and gain more functionality, thread-safety and error handling over time.

The next key things to be worked on are Optionality (as this has changed in every Swift BETA), the CoreDataStack, adding more finders with more functionality and improving the NSFetchedResultsControllerExtension.

 

 

iPhone 6 and 6 Plus side by side Paper Comparison

So on September 9th (as of time of writing thats last night) Apple announced (among other things) the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus… Both are which are larger than the any predecessor. I won’t go into details of what each phone does / has… as i’m sure you can find that information anywhere on the Internet :). The biggest question on everyones minds is….

Which should I buy?

So, I was curious about the sizing of the new devices, therefor I made a really quick and dirty paper prototype with the precise dimensions. What it shows… the 6 Plus is a beast, larger, but somewhat smaller than a Samsung Galaxy Note II, but probably a commuters powerhouse, a halfway house between the traditional sized iPhone and iPad. Whereas the iPhone 6 is a welcomed and comfortable size increase on the iPhone 5/5S/5C generation.

Samsung devices in the Apple Spaces

Now next to the original devices

IMG_1330 iPhone sizing

 

Despite the iPhone 6 Plus being ginormous… I think thats the one i’ll be getting… Having to commute 1 hour a day on a train and being an overall geek… it suits me well ūüôā

For more info on the specs and sizing of the new iPhones I suggest visiting the apple specs webpage.

 

Brisk a simple lightweight Networking Framework written in Swift


This is gonna be a short and sweet blog post… I’ve been working on a little pet project to practise and learn some Swift, so I thought, what do I use the most in projects these days… its networking. I’ve published on github.com my first attempt Brisk, its no where near complete and only has basic functionality right now, but if it becomes interesting i’ll pick up the effort and add more, until then, its a great educational exercise, you can check it out here and be sure to contribute back ūüôā it should work on both OS X and iOS and is MIT Licensed.

 

Swift the new Language for writing Cocoa and Cocoa Touch Apps

swift programming language

Introducing Swift

I’ve been at WWDC 2014 all week and one of the major announcements from Apple was a new programming language they’ve been working on named “Swift”, immediately it flashed me back to a really old WWDC where they announced an experimental language they were playing with named “Dylan” but I could be wrong.

Swift attempts to¬†deliver a fast modernised language that looks and behaves as an interpreted language such as Ruby or Python but has all the power of a compiled language such as C++/Objective-C.¬†From what i’ve seen on the interweb and twitter, there seems to have been a mixed reception from developers, but overall its looking more positive than not… My stance is… i’m gonna read more than 60 pages and wait more than 48 hours before declaring either my love or hate for Swift :)… If you’ve seen the blogosphere lately, you’ll understand what I mean.

Apple have released a publicly available (so i’m guessing not under NDA) Swift book on the iBook Store thats lengthy, doesn’t assume you’re an 8 year old and gives a decent overview of the Swift programming language, in what seems is from a “answer all of your questions and thoughts” approach, with some examples and exercises along the way.

I’ve attended the Swift labs almost everyday this week armed with questions, thoughts, suggestions and generally the engineers have been great at responding to everything. As a result i’ve filed radars, been convinced i’m not crazy and had some insight into the future of the language.

My main bone of contentions so far are:

  • No sensible/pretty way to selectively expose method A vs method B.
  • The threading model is still a little undefined and incomplete.
  • Autocomplete and LLDB seem to still be a very much work in progress.
  • Downcasting syntax is overly verbose.
  • Did I do it wrong? or did Xcode just shit itself?

However¬†having said that, Swift was released early to us the developers, in order to get feedback/suggestions and help Apple build it to how we want… lets not forget, i’ve had (at the time of writing) 96 hours experience in Swift and its only been public for around the same amount of time… so a lot is likely to change.

What I like so far:

  • Generally a nicer more modern syntax
  • Less “falling back” to C for common things
  • Less unnecessary verbosity *(most the time)
  • Pretty seamless “bridging”/”interoperability” (or whatever the term should be) to existing Objective-C code
  • Namespacing, Modules & Frameworks
  • Explicit typing support with some intelligence from the compiler too
  • An emphasis on “tell the compiler as much as possible”

As soon as I figure out whether or not we’re allowed to talk about more, i’ll go into more detail on some of these points and post some sample code. I’m currently working on an iOS Framework written in pure swift that I’m sure people will enjoy, i’ll be posting it on GitHub in the near future here it is now, but its probably far away from prime time and perhaps a little useless ūüôā but a great way to learn Swift!

As always, thoughts and criticisms should be constructive and not defamatory and furthermore, have your own opinion, no one you follow on twitter is an expert on this yet ūüôā so don’t be afraid to voice your opinions and join in the healthy discussion.

If you wanna chat about it more, i’m @ArmstrongAtWork on twitter.

 

 

 

Objective-C iOS Code Style Guidelines (Part #1)

I move around on different projects a lot and work with different developers every few months. One thing I’ve noticed is people picking up bad habits from blogs and Stack Overflow posts that get very popular despite their quality (this is not a blanket statement of course)… On the other hand however, I’m able to share experiences with other developers and pickup some good tips in the process. One bone picking point is always what convention to use, when, where and most importantly… Why!

Something i’ve been asked for a few times recently and something I continually tweak as my own preferences and style changes is my Objective-C iOS Code Style Guideline doc. I thought i’d share it here for everyone to use, love and consume. All I ask is that you don’t steal it as your own and that you perform any discussion on twitter using #mike.kz or message me @italoarmstrong ūüôā

These guidelines of course are my own personal preferences, which have developed over many years and will continue to change, even as writing this point, I changed my mind on a few points in the below guide. So take inspiration from it, rather than thinking “this is correct way of doing it” as its not. Thats usually the point in a “guideline”.

… 

 

Reading Linux extfs (ext2/3/4) in Mac OS X

I have a collection of both Mac OS X and Linux servers dotted around the place… Sometimes I need to read ext4 formatted drives on my Mac’s… this always proves an annoying problem where I have to mount them inside a Virtual Machine and copy things across…. Pain and Slow!

I searched the interweb for a solution to this… and most ¬†guides are about 3 years out of date, so here’s one from 2013 that works on Lion / Mountain Lion and even Mavericks DP1/2.

Download and Install : OSXFUSE-2.5.4.dmg (this took off where MacFuse left off and even has compatibility for old MacFuse plugins).

Download and Install : fuse-ext2-0.0.7.dmg

Plug in your ext fs formatted drive… Voila! I wouldn’t rely on this in a production environment mind you… but its decent if you just need to grab some files from a USB drive quickly for example.